Le vol du Monarque

Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico. For scientists, this unique migration on our planet is a veritable enigma of nature. Today, the destruction of the habitat of the Monarch threatens this extraordinary phenomenon.

Chaque automne plusieurs dizaines de millions de papillons monarques (Danaus plexippus) parcourent plus de 4 500km pour se rendre depuis le Canada et les Etats-Unis vers les montagnes du Michoacán au Mexique. Pour les scientifiques, cette migration unique au monde est une véritable énigme de la nature.  (voir fichier PDF en bas)

The Flight of the Monarch. Mexique. Mars 2008. Monarchs butterflies in the sky. Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico. For scientists, this unique migration on our planet is a veritable enigma of nature. (overprinting of two images)
The Flight of the Monarch. Mexique. Mars 2008. Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico. For scientists, this unique migration on our planet is a veritable enigma of nature.
The Flight of the Monarch. Mexique. Agangueo. Mars 2008. Portrait of Chip Taylor Director of ÒMonarch WatchÓ and Professor of Ecology and Biology at the University of Kansas in the United States. Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico.
The Flight of the Monarch. Mexique. Mars 2008. Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico. For scientists, this unique migration on our planet is a veritable enigma of nature. Picture show a femal butterflie
The Flight of the Monarch. Mexique. Mars 2008. Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico. For scientists, this unique migration on our planet is a veritable enigma of nature. Picture show hundred of butterflies on pin ayamel
The Flight of the Monarch. Angangueo. Mexique. Mars 2008. Monarchs butterflies on a branch of ayamel tree. Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico. For scientists, this unique migration on our planet is a veritable enigma of nature.
The Flight of the Monarch. Mexique. Mars 2008. Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico. For scientists, this unique migration on our planet is a veritable enigma of nature. Picture was done in the forest of ayamel trees near Angangueo.
The Flight of the Monarch. Mexique. Mars 2008. Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico. For scientists, this unique migration on our planet is a veritable enigma of nature. Picture show hundred of butterflies on pin ayamel
The Flight of the Monarch. Angangueo. Mexique. Mars 2008. Monarchs butterflies on a branch of ayamel tree. Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico. For scientists, this unique migration on our planet is a veritable enigma of nature.
The Flight of the Monarch. Zitacuero. Mexique. Mars 2008. Chip Taylor has initiated the marking of butterflies. The technique consists of sticking a small stamp with an identification number on the wing of the insect. The picture show a Tag JGX 401 who was done by Bremer County Conservation on 31 August 2007 in Sumner Iowa, U.S.A. The butterfly was recovered on 6 March 2008 at Cerro Pelon Mexico. The butterfly traveled 1686 miles (2713km) from Sumner, Iowa USA to Cerro Pelon, Mexico.
The Flight of the Monarch. Mexique. Mars 2008. Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico. For scientists, this unique migration on our planet is a veritable enigma of nature. Jean Lauriault watching a monarch with a glass.
The Flight of the Monarch. Mexique. Mars 2008. The migration of the monarch is in peril because of the growing loss of habitat in Mexico due to the deforestation of the Oyamel tree. Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico.
The Flight of the Monarch. Mexique. Mars 2008. The migration of the monarch is in peril because of the growing loss of habitat in Mexico due to the deforestation of the Oyamel tree. Picture show pins ayamel. Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico.
The Flight of the Monarch. Near Angangueo. Mexique. Mars 2008. Picture of deforestation. The migration of the monarch is in peril because of the growing loss of habitat in Mexico due to the deforestation of the Oyamel tree.
The Flight of the Monarch. Mexique. Mars 2008. Painting wall near Angangueo showing the village and the Monarchs butterflies. Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico. For scientists, this unique migration on our planet is a veritable enigma of nature.
The Flight of the Monarch. Mexique. Mars 2008. Gabriel S‡nchez Ledezma show small tree ayamel and encimo for the reforestation. The association « alternare » have planted more than 3000 trees last year. The migration of the monarch is in peril because of the growing loss of habitat in Mexico due to the deforestation of the Oyamel tree.
The Flight of the Monarch. Mexique. Mars 2008. Picture of a ayamel trees near Angangueo. Oyamel pine forests of Mexico which have an average altitude of 3200 meters.
The Flight of the Monarch. Angangueo. Mexique. Mars 2008. Police protecting the forest with arms because illegal deforestation happen in the reserve of Angangueo.The migration of the monarch is in peril because of the growing loss of habitat in Mexico due to the deforestation of the Oyamel tree. Each year tens of millions of Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) travel more than 4500 kilometers from Canada and the United States to the mountains of Michoacan in Mexico.